Presentation Directory Tomato & Health Research Links Releases

Research

In this section you can find research papers funded by some of our members, partner organizations or public bodies, and abstracts or reviews of articles published in peer-reviewed publications.

The last 10 articles are listed below and you can search the complete database by AUTHOR, COUNTRY or KEYWORD.

Researchers: Please contact us to would like your research posted here

Auteur(s) : ISHS
Title : Proceedings of the 14th International Symposium on Processing Tomato
Abstract : The proceedings of the 14th International Symposium on Processing Tomato held in Santiago (Chile) in March 2017 contain 33 scientific articles. It is available for sale from the SISh website at the price of 69 euros.
Reference : ISHS
Keyword(s): agronomy, technology, health, weeds, diseases, irrigation, products
Language : English
Country : Chile
Full text : Go to website
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2017-06-14



Auteur(s) : UCCE
Title : Sample costs to produce processing tomatoes in the Sacramento Valley & Northern Delta-2017
Abstract : UC Agricultural Issues Center has released an updated study on the costs and returns of producing transplanted processing tomatoes under subsurface drip irrigation in the Sacramento Valley and northern Delta region. The analysis is based upon a hypothetical well-managed farming operation using practices common to the region. The costs, materials and practices shown in this study will not apply to all farms. Growers, UC Cooperative Extension farm advisors and other agricultural associates provided input and reviewed the methods and findings of the study. The hypothetical 3,500-acre farm, focuses on production costs for growing transplanted processing tomatoes under subsurface drip irrigation on 60-inch beds in San Joaquin County and the lower Sacramento Valley.
Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): cost, production
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : emmiyao@ucanr.edu
Date : 2017-04-07



Auteur(s) : UCCE Yolo County
Title : 2017 South Sacramento Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting
Abstract : Presentations made at South Sacramento Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting on January 25, 2017
Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): seed, disease, variety, pests
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : emmiyao@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2017-02-14



Auteur(s) : UCCE San Joaquin
Title : 2017 Northern San Joaquin Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting
Abstract : Research presentations made during the 2017 Northern San Joaquin Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting
Reference : presentations
Keyword(s):
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : bjaegerter@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2017-02-14



Auteur(s) : OI Pomodoro Nord Italia
Title : 2016 variety trials in the North of Italy
Abstract : 2016 tomato variety trials in the North of Italy
Reference : OI Pomodoro Nord Italia
Keyword(s): varities; seeds
Language : Italian
Country : Italy
Full text : Go to website
Email :
Date : 2017-02-14



Auteur(s) : CTRI
Title : 2016 research report
Abstract : California Tomato Research Institute 2016 Project Report
Reference : CTRI
Keyword(s): pests, diseases, agronomy, varieties, weeds
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : chuck@tomatonet.org
Date : 2017-02-14



Auteur(s) : M. Causse, J. Giovannoni, M. Bouzayen, M. Zouine (Eds.)
Title : Book: The Tomato Genome
Abstract : This book describes the strategy used for sequencing, assembling and annotating the tomato genome and presents the main characteristics of this sequence with a special focus on repeated sequences and the ancestral polyploidy events. It also includes the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a major crop plant as well as a model for fruit development, and the availability of the genome sequence has completely changed the paradigm of the species’ genetics and genomics. The book describes the numerous genetic and genomic resources available, the identified genes and quantitative trait locus (QTL) identified, as well as the strong synteny across Solanaceae species. Lastly, it discusses the consequences of the availability of a high-quality genome sequence of the cultivated species for the research community. It is a valuable resource for students and researchers interested in the genetics and genomics of tomato and Solanaceae.
Reference : Springer
Keyword(s): Plant Breeding, Biotechnology, Plant Genetics and Genomics, Agriculture Bioinformatics
Language : English
Country :
Full text : Go to website
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2017-01-11



Auteur(s) : Dr Autar Mattoo
Title : Book: Achieving Sustainable Cultivation of Tomatoes
Abstract : Tomatoes are the second most important vegetable crop in the world after potatoes. Originating in South America, they are now grown widely around the world. As the population continues to grow, there is a need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable.
Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of tomatoes at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. The book begins by looking at improvements in cultivation techniques, before moving on to review advances in ensuring genetic diversity, understanding of tomato physiology and breeding techniques. The collection concludes by discussing developments in understanding and managing pests and diseases.
Achieving sustainable cultivation of tomatoes will be a standard reference for horticultural scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in tomato cultivation.
The discount code WPTC20 will give WPTC members 20% off the normal retail price to £144 / $180 / €172 on https://shop.bdspublishing.com/checkout/Store/bds/Detail/WorkGroup/3-190-52948
Reference : Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing
Keyword(s): tomato, cultivation, sustainability
Language : English
Country : United Kingdom
Full text : Go to website
Email : info@bdspublishing.com
Date : 2016-11-21



Auteur(s) : INTA - Tomate 2000
Title : Association Tomate 2000 2015/16 annual report
Abstract : Annual report from Association Tomate 2000: detailed production reports for the 2015/16 season and research results
Reference : INTA - Tomate 2000
Keyword(s): production, variety trials
Language : Spanish
Country : Argentina
Full text : Go to website
Email : argerich.cosme@inta.gob.ar
Date : 2016-10-04



Auteur(s) : INTA - Tomate 2000
Title : Tomate 2000 integrated production guidelines
Abstract : Crop Directives used by Tomato 2000 Association for Integrated Production of processing tomatoes in Argentina
Reference : INTA - Tomate 2000
Keyword(s): variety, crop, integrated production
Language : Spanish
Country : Argentina
Full text : Go to website
Email : argerich.cosme@inta.gob.ar
Date : 2016-10-04



Auteur(s) : The American Phytopathological Society
Title : Tomato Diseases App
Abstract : The Tomato MD App can help you:
- Identify diseases and pests from anywhere, anytime—without an internet connection
- Get high-quality, peer-reviewed information from the world's top experts
- Use images, keys, and management information to help ensure accurate diagnosis
Tomato MD contains photo galleries, identification tools, decision support tools, diagnostic keys, and quality information from some of the world's top crop scientists dealing with tomato crops.

This app stands apart for its peer-reviewed information from the world’s top experts in tomato disease, as well as popular and trusted APS PRESS books, such as the Tomato Health Management and the Compendium of Tomato Diseases and Pests, Second Edition.
Reference : App
Keyword(s): diseases
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : apsapps@scisoc.org
Date : 2016-09-23



Auteur(s) : Emmanuel A. Torres-Quezada
Title : Differences in Fertility of Soil and Soilless Media
Abstract : The use of soilless media in tomato production has grown steadily in the United States and around the world to reduce soil borne disease issues and increase yield.

Providing information about key differences between this media type and soil is a new educational presentation from the Plant Management Network (PMN) entitled “Tomato Fertility - Soil vs Soilless,” now available as part of the Focus on Tomato resource for growers, crop consultants, and extension agents.

The webcast, developed by Emmanuel A. Torres-Quezada, General Manager at Freedom Ag Research in Latin America, provides guidance on how to adapt irrigation and fertilization strategies to match the different properties of the growing media. The presentation discusses the principal factors that impact water and fertilizer mobilization and retention, and how these interactions can affect crop quality and profitability.

Specific properties reviewed in the webcast include:

• Media particle size and nutrient profiles
• Water holding and cation exchange capacities
• Movement and loss of water, nutrients and fertilizer

Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): fertilizer, soil
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : etorres1618@gmail.com
Date : 2016-07-20



Auteur(s) : Diane Barrett
Title : Research publications on tomatoes from UC Davis
Abstract : List of research publications by Diane Barrett and her team at UC Davis
Reference : UC Davis
Keyword(s): processing, quality, variety
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2016-05-13



Auteur(s) : CTRI
Title : 2015 Research report
Abstract : CTRI 2015 research reports
Reference : CTRI
Keyword(s): agronomy, pests, variety, irrigation
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : chuck@tomatonet.org
Date : 2016-05-11



Auteur(s) : ISHS
Title : Abstract book from the 14th ISHS Symposium on the Processing Tomato
Abstract : Abstract book from the 14th ISHS Symposium on the Processing Tomato held in Santiago (Chile) in March 2016
Reference : ISHS
Keyword(s): agronimy, seed, health, quality, variety, technology
Language : English
Country : Chile
Full text : Go to
Email : wptc2016@tomate.org
Date : 2016-05-11



Auteur(s) : Juan Ignacio Macua
Title : 2015 tomato variety trials in Navarra
Abstract : Tomato varity trials in Anvarra in 2015
Reference : INTA
Keyword(s): variety, trials, seeds
Language : Spanish
Country : Spain
Full text : Go to website
Email : jmacua@saremail.com
Date : 2016-03-18



Auteur(s) : Plant Management Network
Title : Focus on tomato - webcast series
Abstract : The Plant Management Network (PMN) is a nonprofit online publishing effort whose mission is to enhance the health, management, and production of agricultural and horticultural crops. We achieve this mission by publishing applied, multidisciplinary online resources for researchers, consultants, growers, pesticide applicators, and other professionals involved in the management of large and small crops.
Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): disease, seed, pests
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : editorialoffice@plantmanagementnetwork.org
Date : 2016-02-23



Auteur(s) : Gene Miyao
Title : Processing Tomato Production: Seed Sector and Propagation in California
Abstract : Over 100 processing tomato varieties are commonly grown in California each year on about 275,000 acres. Currently, nearly all the varieties are hybrids. The planting method has switched from direct field seeding to use of greenhouse-grown transplants, with some exceptions, based on seed cost and ease of field propagation. This presentation will provide an overview of changes and some reasons for the switch in planting method including some economics.
Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): seed, variety
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : emmiyao@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2016-02-22



Auteur(s) : ISHS
Title : Program of the 14th ISHS Symposium on the Processing Tomato
Abstract : The final program of the 14th ISHS Symposium on the Processing Tomato which will take place in Santiago (Chile) on 6-9 March 2016 is now available
Reference : ISHS
Keyword(s): symposium, health, seeds, agrnonomy, pests
Language : English
Country : Chile
Full text : Go to
Email : wptc2016@tomate.org
Date : 2016-02-08



Auteur(s) : Scott Stoddard
Title : UCCE Merced county research update 2015
Abstract : UCCE Merced county research update 2015
Reference : Presentation
Keyword(s): weeds, pests
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2016-02-01



Auteur(s) : Tom Turini
Title : Merced county tomato processing research
Abstract :
Reference : Presentation
Keyword(s): weeds, pests ,diseases
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : taturini@ucanr.edu
Date : 2016-02-01



Auteur(s) : Tom Gordon
Title : Fusarium wilt in California
Abstract :
Reference : presentation
Keyword(s): disease
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2016-02-01



Auteur(s) : Luca Sandei
Title : Processing tomato research in SSICA
Abstract :
Reference : presentation
Keyword(s): procesing, variety, health, processing
Language : English
Country : Italy
Full text : Go to
Email : luca.sandei@ssica.it
Date : 2016-02-01



Auteur(s) : Ontario Tomato Research Institute
Title : OTRI 2015 annual research report
Abstract : Research financed by Ontario Tomato Research Institute
Reference : research report
Keyword(s): weeds, pests, diseases, varieties
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to website
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2016-02-01



Auteur(s) : INTA - TOMATE 2000
Title : INTA - TOMATE 2000 2014/15 annual report
Abstract : Annual report from Association Tomate 2000: detailed production reports for the 2014/15 season and research results
Reference : INTA -TOMATE 2000
Keyword(s): production, variety trials
Language : Spanish
Country : Argentina
Full text : Go to
Email : argerich.cosme@inta.gob.ar
Date : 2015-09-30



Auteur(s) : ISHS
Title : Proceedings of the XIII International Symposium on Processing Tomato
Abstract : Proceedings of the XIII International Symposium on Processing Tomato - 45 scientific articles
Reference : WPTC congress
Keyword(s): agronomy, technology, health, weeds, diseases, irrigation, products
Language : English
Country : Italy
Full text : Go to website
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2015-05-11



Auteur(s) : Doug Doohan
Title : Weed Control Considerations
Abstract : Controlling weeds is the number one problem for many organic vegetable farmers. Weed control in tomato may involve the use of different kinds of mulches, flaming, or herbicides that are approved for organic production. The connection between weed control and soil quality may not be immediately apparent, but on close examination the two are intrinsically linked. In this webcast we will explore aspects of that linkage and look at how good soil management may create an environment less favorable to weed growth.

In particular we will explore the idea of ‘soil balancing’, popular with organic farmers, and lay out a scientific basis for why a balanced soil may create an optimum environment for crop growth that will be very competitive with weeds. Farmers, consultants, county agents and those who provide soil amendments to farmers will all gain a better understanding of soil balancing and how the judicious use of limestone and gypsum can improve soil quality.

You will learn what is meant by 'soil balancing’, and the science behind the theory of the ‘basic cation saturation ratio’ approach to soil management. You will learn to recognize the facts about soil balancing as well as the pseudo-science that is so commonly encountered on this subject. Finally you will also learn about other tried and proven techniques that will help you get weeds under control, whether you farm organically, or conventionally.
Reference : Plant Management network
Keyword(s): weeds, organic
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : Doohan.1@osu.edu
Date : 2015-05-10



Auteur(s) : Ontario Tomato Research Institute
Title : OTRI 2014 annual research report
Abstract : Results of the research funded by the Ontario Tomato Research Institute in 2014 and list of project funded in 2015
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): weed, pest, diseases
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.ca
Date : 2015-04-09



Auteur(s) : Ontario Tomato Research Institute
Title : OTRI 2013 annual research report
Abstract : Ontario Tomato Research Institute 2013 annual research report
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): weed, pests, diesases
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2015-04-09



Auteur(s) : Jeffrey B. Jones, Thomas A. Zitter, Timur M. Momol, and Sally A. Miller
Title : Compendium of Tomato Diseases and Pests, Second Edition
Abstract : The nearly 250 images and associated information in this highly useful and significantly upgraded book allows anyone-from the gardener to professional-to identify, understand, diagnose, and treat more than 60 diseases of tomato occurring throughout the world. This impressive new handbook, written by expert plant pathologists working with this crop, includes nearly 20 new diseases and disorders, including those caused by fungi and oomycetes, bacteria, phytoplasmas, viruses and viroids.

The previous edition of this book was a top-10 best-seller in the Compendium Series and the new edition is even more useful with important coverage of arthropod pests: namely, mites, insects, and “worm” pests. The coverage of pests has been expanded significantly in this edition and includes the addition of 23 color photos from expert entomologists that illustrate these pests and the damage they cause.

Reference : APS Press
Keyword(s): diseases, pests
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : dwuest@scisoc.org
Date : 2015-03-30



Auteur(s) : ISHS
Title : Call for papers for the 14th ISHS Symposium on the Processing Tomato, Santiago (Chile), 6-9 March 2016
Abstract : The 14th ISHS Symposium on the Processing Tomato will be held in parallel with the 12th World Processing Tomato Congress in Santiago (Chile) on 6-9 March 2016

This Symposium is the world’s premier event for the processing tomato production chain. This unique forum brings together academics, researchers, students with growers, processors and industry suppliers from around the world to share the latest knowledge and advances in this globally important industry. It is jointly organized by the International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), Chilealimentos and the World Processing Tomato Council (WPTC).

Abstract submissions for the symposium can now be made by following the guidelines in the call for papers which can be downloaded here. The call for papers will close on 31st August 2015.

Please make sure to forward this information to all your colleagues who should be attending this world’s premier event for researchers and institutions involved in the processing tomato production chain.

For more information, you can contact us at wptc2016@tomate.org.

Reference : ISHS
Keyword(s): variety, health, agronomy, technology
Language : English
Country : Chile
Full text : Go to
Email : wptc2016@tomate.org
Date : 2015-03-05



Auteur(s) : California Tomato Research Institute
Title : CTRI 2014 Project Reports
Abstract : CTRI 2014 Project Reports
Reference : CTRI
Keyword(s): agronomy, pests, variety, irrigation
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : chuck@tomatonet.org
Date : 2015-03-03



Auteur(s) : Juan Ignacio Macua
Title : 2014 variety trials in Navarra
Abstract : INTIA 2014 variety trials in Navarra (Spain)
Reference : INTIA
Keyword(s): variety trials, seeds
Language : Spanish
Country : Spain
Full text : Go to
Email : jmacua@saremail.com
Date : 2015-02-25



Auteur(s) : University of California Cooperative Extension
Title : 2015 Northern San Joaquin Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting
Abstract : Présentations made at the 2015 Northern San Joaquin Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting on January 29, 2015 in Modesto, CA:
•Weed management update - Scott Stoddard
•Evaluation of composted poultry manure and potassium - Gene Miyao
•Evaluation of nematicides for root knot nematode control in tomatoes - Joe Nunez
•Stink bug management update - Tom Turini
•Update on Fusarium diseases of tomato - Mike Davis
•Salinity management for processing tomatoes - Brenna Aegerter
•Evaluating sensor-based irrigation and fertigation scheduling in SDI tomatoes - Mark Lundy
•Surveying the need for an electronic decision support tool for irrigation and nutrient management - Brenna Aegerter
•After fifteen years of cover cropping and reduced tillage, how have soil properties changed? - Jeff Mitchell

Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): agronomy, varieties, weeds, pests
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email :
Date : 2015-02-05



Auteur(s) : University of California Cooperative Extension
Title : 2015 South Sacramento Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting
Abstract : Presentations from the 2015 South Sacramento Valley Processing Tomato Production Meeting:
Gene Miyao - Evaluation of supplemental composted manure & potassium on plant health
•Amelia Harlan - Evaluation of resistant wheat and various grasses on root knot nematode control
•Mike Davis - Update on Fusarium diseases of tomato
•TS&L - Variety Evaluations
•Ag-Seeds Unlimited - Variety Evaluations
•Yolo County Agriculture Department - Local Pesticide Regulation Update
•Tom Turini - Chemical control evaluations for stink bug and for powdery mildew
•Brenna Aegerter - Salinity management in drip irrigated tomatoes
•Daniele Zaccaria - Drought and water management overview in California
•Mike Cahn - Irrigation and nutrient management scheduling with CropManage
•Daniel Geisseler - Surveying the need for an electronic decision support tool
•Mark Lundy - Potential for sensor-based fertigation scheduling in subsuface, drip irrigation

Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): weeds, agronomy, varieties, pests
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : emmiyao@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2015-02-05



Auteur(s) : Juan Ignacio Macua
Title : INTIA 2013 variety trials
Abstract : INTIA 2013 variety trials in Spain
Reference : INTIA
Keyword(s): variety trials, seeds
Language : Spanish
Country : Spain
Full text : Go to website
Email : jmacua@saremail.com
Date : 2015-01-20



Auteur(s) : APS
Title : New ‘Tomato MD’ App Helps Users Diagnose and Treat Sick Tomato Plants
Abstract : Tomato MD is an interactive reference that helps gardeners, professional growers, and consultants identify and manage more than 35 key diseases, insects, and physiological disorders of tomatoes.

Tomato MD is unique in that tomato experts have peer-reviewed all content to ensure the images and information are accurate. And while the information was reviewed by scientists, it is very accessible and published in an easy-to-use, non-scientific format.

Users can sample Tomato MD via the APS Plant Health app. The entire Tomato MD app can be purchased at the introductory rate of just $1.99. Users can also find the app by searching “Tomato MD” or “Plant Health” in their iPhone or iPad’s App Store.

Reference : APS
Keyword(s): diseases
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : pbogdan@scisoc.org
Date : 2014-06-23



Auteur(s) : FLONUDEP consortium
Title : Final report of the FLONUDEP project on LCA of fresh and processed tomatoes
Abstract : The present document was written by consensus and describes the approach, the methodological tools to establish sustainable supply chains and the indicators that can be used to assess sustainability (to the meaning of Sustainable Development) of a product from the horticultural sector All the data, analyses and conclusions from the FLONUDEP Project are presented in summary form.
The industry’s sustainability is measured according to its impacts on the environment, the nutritional quality of the foodstuff and the prevailing social and economic conditions in the sector or the company. The project considers the whole supply chain from the farm to the consumer.
These indicators will:
- help the professionals working in the industry to assess the consequences of altering their production processes or their organisation based on 3 sustainability priorities for their product by eventually using the decision support tool described in paragraph 6;
- help authorities target their policies to manage the sector (regulations support/assistance, etc.)
- provide the consumer with objective information on the product they are buying to make purchasing decisions.
Reference : National French Research Agency with AMITOM
Keyword(s): LCA, water, environment,
Language : English
Country : France
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2014-06-03



Auteur(s) : Brenna Aegerter
Title : Powdery Mildew of Tomatoes
Abstract : This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in arid tomato production areas of the U.S. to recognize and manage powdery mildew of tomato caused by Leveillula. The presentation addresses disease symptoms, identification, life cycle, and host range of the fungus. The impacts of mildew on fruit yield and quality are presented and management strategies are discussed. Although cultural methods can impact the disease and will be mentioned, emphasis will be on chemical tools for disease management. Fungicide resistance management strategies will also be covered. The information presented should allow the practitioner to improve management of this disease.
Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): disease
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : bjaegerter@ucanr.edu
Date : 2014-05-07



Auteur(s) : California Tomato Research institute
Title : CTRI 2013 annual research report
Abstract : This report marks the 45th year of continuous crop research sponsored by California processing tomato growers. This report presents research funded by the
contributing growers of the California Tomato Research Institute, Inc.

Reference : CTRI
Keyword(s): agronomy, pests, variety, irrigation
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : chuck@tomatonet.org
Date : 2014-05-06



Auteur(s) : Diana Horvath
Title : Effective Transgenic Resistance to Bacterial Leaf Spot in Florida Tomatoes
Abstract : This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners primarily in the Southeastern U.S. region to understand a new approach to fighting bacterial spot disease of tomato, which is widespread in hot, humid growing areas and chronically the most significant disease of the Florida fresh market tomato industry. This presentation describes key features of the causal agent, Xanthomonas, and details the conception and execution of the resistance strategy, which has been achieved through the introduction of a common disease resistance gene from pepper by transgenic methods. Field trial data and photos demonstrating the significant reduction in disease severity and increased yield are shown. The issues of regulatory approvals and consumer concerns are discussed. By the end of this presentation, the practitioner should know more about a new tool in development that can help to control this significant disease, eliminate ineffective copper treatments and increase yields, as well as to learn more about what is involved in bringing a transgenic crop to market.
Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): diesase
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : dmh@2blades.org
Date : 2014-03-21



Auteur(s) : Juan Ignacio Macua
Title : 2013 tomato variety trials in Navarra
Abstract : Results of the 2013 tomato variety trails carried out at INTIA in Navarra
Reference : INTIA
Keyword(s): variéty trials, seeds
Language : Spanish
Country : Spain
Full text : Go to website
Email : jmacua@saremail.com
Date : 2014-02-03



Auteur(s) : Hasan Bolkan
Title : Bacterial Canker of Tomatoes and Management Strategies
Abstract : This presentation will help processing tomato and fresh market tomato growers, tomato hybrid seed producers, consultants, and other practitioners around the world, to recognize, monitor, and manage bacterial canker of tomatoes, one of the world’s major diseases of tomato. Control of bacterial canker is based primarily on the use of bacterial canker pathogen-free seeds and field sanitation. The most effective controls are those, which reduce initial inoculum. However, the capacity of bacterial canker pathogen to exist superficially on tomato stems as an epiphyte weighs heavily against its control. Furthermore, the difficulty of recognizing the disease in tomato plants growing under stress conditions makes its detection difficult. Incipient or mild symptoms on the foliage may easily be overlooked as an injury caused by excess fertilization or by applied pesticides. Delay in detection of bacterial canker where regular handling of the plants in cultural operations is required (such as pruning, emasculation, pollination), often results in extensive and rapid spread of the disease. In this presentation we will discuss symptoms to look for in recognizing the disease and how to manage the disease once it has been identified to be present in the field or in the greenhouse.
Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): pests
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : hbolkan@yahoo.com
Date : 2014-01-31



Auteur(s) : Tim Hartz
Title : Managing fertility of drip-irrigated processing tomatoes
Abstract : Presentation slides on Managing fertility of drip-irrigated processing tomatoes
Reference : UC Cooperative Extension | Agricultural Experiment Station presentation
Keyword(s): irrigation, agronomy
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email : tkhartz@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2014-01-23



Auteur(s) : University of California IPM
Title : Irrigation of Processing Tomatoes
Abstract : Irrigation is required in California to meet the crop water use or crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements of processing tomatoes. Components of ETc are evaporation of water from the soil and transpiration of water from plant leaves. Seasonal amounts of ETc mainly depend on climatic conditions, planting time, and crop season. The average seasonal ETc of processing tomatoes in California is 25 inches. However, measured seasonal ETc amounts have ranged from 21 to 30 inches of water, depending on site-specific field conditions.

Furrow irrigation is the most common irrigation method for processing tomatoes. Sprinkle irrigation is commonly used to establish seeded or transplanted stands and is sometimes used for marginal soils or in regions with high water tables. In the San Joaquin Valley, hand-moved sprinklers are used, while in the Sacramento Valley, wheel-line sprinklers are common.

The use of drip irrigation in processing tomatoes is increasing, particularly in the San Joaquin Valley. Subsurface drip irrigation in salt-affected soil is highly profitable compared to furrow and sprinkler irrigation. Surface drip irrigation is also used with drip lines placed directly in the furrow. The use of surface drip irrigation appears to reduce the Phytophthora problems caused by furrow irrigation in fine-textured soil.

Reference : UC IPM Online
Keyword(s): irrigation, agronomy
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to website
Email :
Date : 2014-01-23



Auteur(s) : Bob Gilbertson
Title : Emerging viral and other diseases of processing tomatoes: Biology, Diagnosis and Management
Abstract : Keynote presentation from the ISHS symposium in the Processing Tomato, Beijing , June 2012
Reference : ISHS symposium on thre processing tomato
Keyword(s): pest, virus
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to
Email : rlgilbertson@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2014-01-23



Auteur(s) : Thomas Kuhar
Title : New Insecticides for Controlling Lepidopteran Pests on Tomato
Abstract : Tomato growers have several very effective IPM-friendly insecticides for controlling lepidopteran pests. These insecticides are often much safer for the user and usually do not impact beneficial insects.
This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the US as well other regions to better understand the insecticide options for controlling lepidopteran "worm" pests of tomatoes. It provides the results of current insecticide efficacy experiments conducted on field tomatoes in Virginia. These field trials have demonstrated that such insecticides (including Coragen, Durivo, Voliam, etc.) provide excellent control, equal to or exceeding that of standard pyrethroids.

Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): pests, agronomy
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : tkuhar@vt.edu
Date : 2014-01-20



Auteur(s) : Scott Adkins
Title : Effectively Manage Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus
Abstract : Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) and the thrips that transmit it can cost growers millions of dollars in yield losses, not just for tomatoes but also for peanuts, tobacco, peppers, potatoes, and many other crops.
Dr. Scott Adkins, Research Plant Pathologist at the USDA Agricultural Research Service, addresses this important issue in the latest Focus on Tomato webcast, titled “Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus”.
This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the Southeastern U.S. and other regions of North America to identify and manage TSWV. The presentation also includes:
• Historical and current perspectives on TSWV and related viruses that cause significant economic losses to fresh market and processing tomato.
•Information about host range, symptoms and transmission
• Key TSWV management techniques.
By the end of this presentation, viewers should know more about the tomato spotted wilt virus’ biology and its relation to virus management.

Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): virus
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : Scott.Adkins@ars.usda.gov
Date : 2013-10-18



Auteur(s) : Bill Wintermantel
Title : Curly Top Disease in Tomato
Abstract : Curly top disease has impacted western U.S. agriculture for over a century, and
it is a significant threat to tomato production.

In his Focus on Tomato webcast, Bill Wintermantel, Research Plant Pathologist
at USDA-ARS in Salinas, California, discusses the viruses that cause curly top
disease, as well as Curly Top's biology, transmission through vectors, epidemiology,
and management.

This presentation is designed to provide knowledge of curly top to growers, industry,
and others interested in management of virus diseases affecting tomato production.

Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): curly top, disease, agronomy
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : Bill.Wintermantel@ars.usda.gov
Date : 2013-10-17



Auteur(s) : Bill Wintermantel
Title : Tomato Chlorosis Virus & Tomato Infectious Chlorosis Virus
Abstract : “Tomato Chlorosis Virus & Tomato Infectious Chlorosis Virus” is the latest webcast title produced through the Plant Management Network’s Focus on Tomato resource.
This presentation by Dr. Bill Wintermantel, Research Plant Pathologist at USDA-ARS, will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners responsible for fresh market tomato production under both field and greenhouse conditions.
The presentation specifically addresses:
- Virus symptoms
- Distribution
- Transmission by whitefly vectors
- Approaches for virus identification
- Differentiating viruses from one another
- Specific issues affecting management.
By the end of the presentation, the user should know more about how to identify potentially infected plants, improve management, and limit infection.

Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): virus
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : Bill.Wintermantel@ars.usda.gov
Date : 2013-06-11



Auteur(s) : Steve Weller
Title : Managing Perennial Weeds in Tomatoes
Abstract : Perennial weed infestations in tomato crops can have many negative effects on crops, like lower yields, added costs from losses due to insects and diseases, and reduced-quality products.
The latest Focus on Tomato webcast, titled “Managing Perennial Weeds in Tomatoes,” by Dr. Steve Weller at Purdue University summarizes different perennial weed types, shows examples of problem perennial weeds, and discusses techniques available for managing these weeds.
Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): weeds
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to website
Email : weller@purdue.edu
Date : 2013-04-17



Auteur(s) : Jeffrey P Mitchell, G Miyao, R DeMoura
Title : Cover cropping and conservation tillage in California processing tomato
Abstract : This publication summarises current information on and recent experience from tomato production systems throughout California that use cover crops and various conservation tillage techniques
Reference : UC Davis report
Keyword(s): agronomy, yeild, weeds
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : emmiyao@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2013-03-28



Auteur(s) : INTA - Tomate 2000
Title : Tomate 2000 annual research report
Abstract : 2011/12 research report of the asociacion Tomate 2000 in Argentina (document in Spanish)
Reference : INTA - Tomate 2000
Keyword(s): production, agronomy, variety, seed, pests
Language : Spanish
Country : Argentina
Full text : Go to
Email : carge@laconsulta.inta.gov.ar
Date : 2013-03-01



Auteur(s) : Ontario Tomato Research Institute
Title : OTRI 2012 annual research report
Abstract : Research funded by OTRI in 2012 (table of content on page 1)
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): weeds, agronomy, pests, diseases, varieties
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2013-02-26



Auteur(s) : Robert Nurse
Title : 2012 tomato weed research
Abstract : The information contained in this report is a summary of the 2012 tomato weed research conducted at the Greenhouse and Processing Crops Research Centre (GPCRC) of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Included are summaries of site description variables, treatment lists outlining chemicals, rates, and timing of application as well as crop injury ratings, weed control ratings, and marketable crop yields.
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): weeds
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : nurser@agr.gc.ca
Date : 2013-02-26



Auteur(s) : California Tomato Research Institute
Title : CTRI 2012 annual research report
Abstract : This report marks the 44th year of continuous crop research sponsored by California processing tomato growers. This report details research funded by the contributing growers of the California Tomato Research Institute, Inc.
Reference : California Tomato Research Institute
Keyword(s): agronomy, pests, diseases, processing, weeds, irrigation
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : chuck@tomatonet.org
Date : 2013-02-25



Auteur(s) : Gene Miyao
Title : Processing Tomato Production: California Practices
Abstract : In this webcast, Gene Miyao, Extension Farm Advisor at the University of California, informs practitioners of the general production practices of California processing tomato growers, particularly in the Sacramento Valley.

This presentation is open access through May 31, 2013. Users can view other recent webcasts in the Focus on Tomato resource at www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/fot.

Reference : Plant Management Network webcast
Keyword(s): agronomics
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : emmiyao@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2013-02-22



Auteur(s) : ISHS
Title : Proceedings of the XII International Symposium on the Processing Tomato
Abstract : The proceedings of the XII International Symposium on the Processing Tomato held in Beijing in June 2012 are avaible to buy from ISHS . More information at: http://www.ishs.org/ishs-book/971
S. Colvine, M. Cámara, L Guitong Editors
Reference : ISHS
Keyword(s): agronomy, health, pests , diseases
Language : English
Country : China
Full text : Go to
Email : http://www.ishs.org/ishs-book/971
Date : 2013-01-30



Auteur(s) : LYCOCARD Consortium
Title : List of LYCOCARD project publications
Abstract : List of all publications published as part of the LYCOCARD project on The Role of Lycopene for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

Reference : LYCOCARD
Keyword(s): lycopene, health
Language : English
Country : EU
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2013-01-09



Auteur(s) : Brenna Aegerter
Title : UCCE Statewide Processing Tomato Variety Evaluation Trials 2012
Abstract : University of California Cooperative Extension farm advisors, in cooperation with commercial growers,conducted two early-maturity and six mid-maturity variety evaluation trials in 2012. Seed companies submitted 15 early lines, and 16 replicated and 15 observational entries for the mid-maturity/full-season trial. A major change for our variety evaluation program was the move this season of both Fresno County trials from a field station to commercial fields. This season’s trials saw wide variations in both yield and soluble solids between locations.
Reference : UCCE report
Keyword(s): variety trial
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : bjaegerter@ucanr.edu
Date : 2013-01-08



Auteur(s) : Tania Spenlinhauer
Title : Novel Isothermal Amplification Technology
Abstract : This presentation will give an overview of a novel isothermal amplification technology, DNAble, used for identifying plant pathogens. It describes how DNAble compares to other test platforms currently available and provides an overview of the amplification reaction and assay procedure. Lastly, information will be discussed regarding the first commercial DNAble assay available for detecting Cmm in tomato tissue.

Link: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/industry/tomato/DNAble/
Reference : Plant Management Netword Webcast
Keyword(s): pest, diseases
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to
Email : http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/tomato
Date : 2012-11-28



Auteur(s) : George Kennedy
Title : Thrips as Pests and Vectors of Tospoviruses in Tomato
Abstract : As the primary vector for Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV), thrips are an important
pest to keep at bay.

This latest Focus on Tomato presentation, produced by The Plant Management Network
will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the southern and western
U.S. manage thrips and suppress virus incidence.

This talk, authored by Dr. George Kennedy, Professor of Agriculture and Entomology
Department Head at North Carolina State University, covers…

- The biology of thrips and factors affecting their abundance
- Some background information on TSWV
- The roles of the tobacco thrips and western flower thrips in spread of TSWV
- The use of insecticides, reflective plastic mulch, Actigard, and TSWV resistant
cultivars in the management of thrips

This presentation is open access through December 31, 2012 and can be viewed
at http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/tomato/ThripsTomato/
Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): thrips, agronomy, pests
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to
Email : http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/tomato/ThripsTomato/
Date : 2012-09-19



Auteur(s) : Tom Kuhar
Title : Pest Threat of the Invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug to Tomatoes in the U.S.
Abstract : This webcast presentation will help educate consultants, growers, and other practitioners on the brown marmorated stink bug, which is an invasive pest that is damaging tomatoes in the mid-Atlantic U.S., but is also spreading across the entire U.S. A brief summary of the biology and ecology of this insect is presented as well as what we’ve learned concerning its management in tomatoes and other vegetables.

Reference : Plant Management Network
Keyword(s): pest agronomy
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/tomato/BMSB/
Date : 2012-06-15



Auteur(s) : Cheryl Trueman
Title : Investigations into which pathogens are responsible for, and management of vine decline in
Abstract : Vine decline symptoms on processing tomato, including early dieback of above-ground plant
parts, increased incidence of bacterial disease, banded root lesions, and root decay were reported
in a number of processing tomato fields in Essex and Kent counties in 2009 and 2010. The
disea~e complex associated with vine decline symptoms includes the plant pathogens
Pyrenochaeta terrestris, Pyrenochaela lycopersici, Rhizopycnis vagum, Coflelorrichum
coccodes, and Fusarium spp. We completed several trials evaluating potential products for
management of vine decline under controlled greenhouse conditions, controlled outdoor
conditions, and in a commercial field in 2011. In addition, in order to obtain a better
understanding of symptoms associated with individual pathogens in thc complex, we initiated
growth chamber trials to evaluate symptoms development in tomatoes inoculated with vine
decline pathogens.
Reference : Ontario Tomato Research Institute
Keyword(s): agronomy, pests,
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2012-01-01



Auteur(s) : Cheryl Trueman
Title : Pest Management Strategies in Processing Tomatoes, 2011
Abstract : We evaluated the efficacy of various products applied alone, as a tank mix with Kocide 2000, and alternating applications with Kocide 2000. In 2011, the addition of Serenade, Regalia MAXX, and Actigard to Kocide did not improve control as compared to Kocide alone, although on occasion the level of disease in treatments Regalia MAXX + Kocide and Actigard + Kocide was numerically lower than Kocide alone. Kocide + Dithane were not more effective than Kocide alone.
Reference : Ontario Tomato Research Institute
Keyword(s): agronomy, pests, diseases
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2012-01-01



Auteur(s) : Steve Loewen
Title : Advancing the competitiveness of Ontario's processing tomato industry by piloting innovative solutions to emerging root disease pressures causing vine decline 2010 to 2012
Abstract : 1. Research questions and project objectives
(a) To determine if any differences exist between the root systems of breeding lines and cultivars in their response to vine decline disease complex. Are there differences in plant vigour, yield, or fruit quality? Can we find any differences in the root systems, and in numbers of disease lesions? Can we find differences now that will lead to future studies to learn what to look for (ie. markers) when selecting for tolerance or resistance to vine decline?
(b) To survey the different microbes (both pathogenic and beneficial) present in the surrounding soil. in the rhizosphere (the root/soil interface), and inside the tomato roots. What pathogens are involved in vine decline? How prevalent are they and where are they found? Can we identify beneficial soil microbes that would suppress vine decline. and that might be suitable inoculants for plug plants?
(c) To develop low-cost, rapid diagnostic tests to identify vine decline. Is there a test we can use to confirm the presence of vine decline in tomato plants? Can we determine prior to planting, if a particular field poses a risk of vine decline?
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): disease, pest, agronomy
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2012-01-01



Auteur(s) : Steve Loewen
Title : Processing tomato breeding research report to the Ontario Tomato Research Institute, November 2011
Abstract : In earlier tomato breeding work at AAFC-GPCRC Harrow, modern cultivated varieties of tomato were hybridized with wild species of tomato. These crosses represent a source of new genetic variation to broaden the genetic base of breeding lines and Ontario processing tomato cultivars developed from them. More genetic diversity among cultivars is associated with reduced risk of disease epidemics, and
greater tolerance to weather extremes.
While it is not an easy task, in some respects, it is easier to make the cross between the wild species and cultivated tomatoes than it is to bring the resulting hybrid to a point where it is useful to private sector breeders. The work at Ridgetown continues to focus on backcrossing and selection to combine the new genetic variation with commercially adapted traits for Ontario.
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): breeding
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2012-01-01



Auteur(s) : Laura L. Van Eerd
Title : Impact of Cover Crops on Processing Tomato: Yield, Qualily, Pest Pressure, Soil Health, and Economics
Abstract : Cover crops over the long-term may increase soil organic matter, soil and plant health and crop
productivity. However the short-term impact of cover crops on processing tomato production is
unknown. The objective of this project was to compare the impact of cover crops planted before
processing tomato. The cover crops planted after spring wheat were I) oat, 2) fall rye. 3) oilseed
radish, 4) mix of oilseed radish and rye. and 5) no cover crop control.
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): agronomy, yield, quality
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2012-01-01



Auteur(s) : Darren Robinson
Title : Weed control in tomatoes (2011)
Abstract : This trial was established to assess tolerance of transplanted tomato to combinations of
simulated hail damage and various postemergence herbicides (Pinnacle, Sencor and Prism), to
determine whether these cumulative stresses reduce yield more than each stress individually.
The combination of hail damage plus Sencor caused more injury, and reduced dry weight and
yield more than hail alone, hail plus Pinnacle or hail plus Prism. There is evidence of a
cumulative effect of hail damage and a high rate of Sencor (200 g/ae).
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): weeds, agronomy
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : opvg@opvg.org
Date : 2012-01-01



Auteur(s) : Luca Sandei et al.
Title : Variey trials 2008
Abstract : The results are reported of the 19th year of testing on commercial hybrid lines (15 hybrids), as requested by various seed companies, for their suitability in the
production of tomato products such as tomato pulp and crushed and/or diced tomato.
Reference : Industria Conserve - SSICA
Keyword(s): variety trials, quality
Language : Italian
Country : Italy
Full text : Go to
Email : luca.sandei@ssica.it
Date : 2011-12-01



Auteur(s) : Montana Camara
Title : Research trends on tomato products
Abstract : Presentation made during WPTC Board meeting in PAris on 18 October 2010
Reference : presentation
Keyword(s): tomato, health, lycopene, regulation
Language : English
Country : Spain
Full text : Go to
Email : mcamara@farm.ucm.es
Date : 2010-11-17



Auteur(s) : Rupam Kapoor
Title : Induced Resistance in Mycorrhizal Tomato is correlated to Concentration of Jasmonic Acid
Abstract : The study shows that Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) are capable of imparting disease tolerance in tomato plants pre-infected with Fusarium Oxysporum f. sp. Lycopersici (FOL).
Inoculation of tomato seedlings with Glomus Macrocarpum (GM) or Glomus Fasciculatum (GF), 20 days after infection with FOL reduced pathogen spread and disease severity by 75 and 78 %, respectively. The mycorrhizal plants showed increased growth, possessed higher Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase activity (PAL), phenol concentration and foliar trichome density. Up to nine-fold increase in concentration of Jasmonic Acid (JA) was observed in mycorrhizal tomato plants compared
to FOL-infected control plants. The increased JA concentration in mycorrhizal plants was concomitant to systemic enhanced defence response measured in terms of increase in PAL activity, concentration of phenols and trichome density in leaves. The above parameters shoFwed strong positive correlation
with endogenous level of JA. The results suggest implication of JA in AMF-induced systemic resistance.
Reference : OnLine Journal of Biological Sciences
Keyword(s): disease resistance
Language : English
Country : India
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2010-08-03



Auteur(s) : Lukas Herwig
Title : Tomatoes Against Drought
Abstract : Without water there is no life, but even in deserts, where water is rarely available, life is possible. How? A research team in Connecticut asked the same question in their quest to produce a drought resistant tomatoes.
Reference : AgriFood Awareness Australia
Keyword(s): GMO drought resistance
Language : English
Country : USA
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2010-08-03



Auteur(s) : K.C. Bansal
Title : Biotechnology for Sustainable Agriculture
Abstract : Indian Agriculture: Priority Traits
• Increased productivity
CMS systems
High photosynthesis
• Abiotic stress tolerance (drought, salt, high temperature)
• Insect/pest and disease resistance (viral, fungal, bacterial)
• Nutritional quality improvement
• Biofortification -carotene (wheat, rice, mustard)
• Iron, Zinc (wheat and rice)
• Lycopene, Zeaxanthin, Lutein (tomato)
• Processing quality of fruits and vegetables
• Extended shelf life (tomato, mango, banana, papaya)
• Efficient resource utilization: N,P,K and micronutritents
Reference : 6th Global Knowledge Millennium Summit on "Biotechnology and Nanotechnology for Sustainable Agriculture
Keyword(s): GMO abiotic stress
Language : English
Country : India
Full text : Go to
Email : kailashbansal@hotmail.com
Date : 2010-08-03



Auteur(s) : Robyn Neeson
Title : Organic processing Tomato Production
Abstract : Large-scale monoculture production is a feature of conventional processing tomato operations. Processing tomatoes are mechanically harvested and transported in bulk carriers to processors. Organic production on the same scale is unlikely to be successful. However, careful field layout involving
intercropping with other species or staggering
plantings could increase the scale of operations and extend the harvest period.
Reference : NSW agriculture
Keyword(s): organic
Language : English
Country : Australia
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : Laura Van Eerd & Steven Loewen
Title : Impact of Winter Wheat Management on Processing Tomato Yield and Quality
Abstract : A field experiment was designed to evaluate the response of processing tomato yield and quality to typical winter wheat management practices of: 1) leaving the straw in the field -control plots, 2) physically removing straw after wheat harvest, or 3) leaving the
straw in the field with a fall application of nitrogen fertilizer at 30 Ib N/ac to encourage
microbial breakdown of the straw. Sites were in Leamington with tomatoes in 2008 and 09 and in Ridgetown with tomatoes in 2007, 08, and 09.
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): weed
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : sloewen@ridgetownc.uoguelph.ca
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : Steve Loewen
Title : 2009 Processing Tomato Breeding Report
Abstract : (a) The Ridgelown processing tomato breeding program has the primary objective of providing
enhanced germplasm for O.T.R.I. member breeders to promote sustainability of the Ontario tomato industry.
(b) Horizontal, or additive genetic resistance to disease is a system of disease resistance largely overlooked by tomato breeders in the past. This strategy offers durable tolerance to disease and has potential for managing diseases where traditional vertical resistance has not yet proved helpful.
(c) Soluble solids are an important quality component of tomatoes for sauces and paste since the concentration of tomato solids represents a significant energy requirement in the manufacture of these products. Measurements on the natural tomato soluble solids contcnt of advanced breeding lines can assist when selecting parents for the development of new breeding lines.
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): breeding
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email : sloewen@ridgctownc.uoguelph.ca
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : Cheryl Trueman
Title : Pest Management Strategies for Processing Tomatoes
Abstract : Key findings of ongoing trials on pest management
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): diesease, pest, IPM
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : Darren Robinson
Title : Weed controls in tomatoes
Abstract : Summary of various weed trials conducted in 2009
Reference : OTRI
Keyword(s): weeds, pesticides
Language : English
Country : Canada
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : B. R. Hanson
Title : UC IPM Pest Management Guidelines: Tomato
Abstract : Irrigation is required in California to meet the crop water use or crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements of processing tomatoes. Components of ETc are evaporation of water from the soil and transpiration of water from plant leaves. Seasonal amounts of ETc mainly depend on climatic conditions, planting time, and crop season. The average seasonal ETc of processing tomatoes in California is 25 inches. However, measured seasonal ETc amounts have ranged from 21 to 30 inches of water, depending on site-specific field conditions.

Furrow irrigation is the most common irrigation method for processing tomatoes. Sprinkle irrigation is commonly used to establish seeded or transplanted stands and is sometimes used for marginal soils or in regions with high water tables. In the San Joaquin Valley, hand-moved sprinklers are used, while in the Sacramento Valley, wheel-line sprinklers are common.

Reference : UC Davis
Keyword(s): irrigation, pest management, IPM
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email :
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : LYCOCARD Consortium
Title : LYCOCARD 2010 annual report
Abstract : LYCOCARD 2010 annual report
Reference : LYCOCARD
Keyword(s): tomato, health, CVD, lycopene
Language : English
Country : EU
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : Kathy Coatney
Title : More tomato fields undergo conversion to subsurface drip
Abstract : Subsurface drip irrigation is the rule, not the exception, for processing tomatoes on the
west side of the San Joaquin Valley. The majority of growers in western Fresno County use drip, according to Tim Hartz, University of California, Davis, extension specialist.
Reference : Ag Alert
Keyword(s): irrigation
Language : English
Country : California
Full text : Go to
Email : kacoatney@gmail.com
Date : 2010-07-14



Auteur(s) : LYCOCARD
Title : Preliminary results from the LYCOCARD project and opportunities for promotion
Abstract : Prsentations from the LYCOCARD workshop in Estoril
Reference : presentations
Keyword(s): lycopene, CVD, health
Language : English
Country : EU
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2010-07-06



Auteur(s) : BIOACTIVE-NET consortium
Title : HANDBOOK on BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS from TOMATO PROCESSING RESIDUES
Abstract : The aim of this handbook is to provide an overview about the bioactive
compounds in tomato processing residues, the extraction techniques and
the application possibilities in the food and cosmetic industries.
The Bioactive-net manual is a collection of three publications as part of the project BIOACTIVE-NET. The aim of this project is to collect the most relevant knowledge and technology concerning bioactive compounds
in tomato, olive and grape processing residues, from techniques of extraction, to application fields and economic feasibility of the extraction, and at the same time make it accessible to the public.
Reference : information booklet
Keyword(s): lycopene, processing waste
Language : English
Country : European Union
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2010-02-22



Auteur(s) : Luca Sandei
Title : Processing Tomatoes in 2009: Research, Innovation and Total Quality to Compete
Abstract : Many aspects of our daily life have changed dramatically over the last few years. The world is smaller and more connected, life is more frenetic, and food has become not only matter of nutrition but will play a very important role into humans health and development sustainability of the agriculture and consequently of the modern society.
What are the most important items in the current tomato industry today ?
• Growing demand of natural food with new sustainable approach that embrace environment, crop management and soil fertility (tomato sustainability) .
• Ensuring high quality food models like standards reference in common markets.
• Assessing Traceability and Origin indication of products as a way of certification of authenticity.
• Processing innovation and application of new technologies for food safety and recycling.
• Considering that modern customers have become significantly aware that a successful long life depends on many biological strategies to promote cells survival against many internal and external stimuli (tomato antioxidant activity prospective).
• Studying and use of new types of packaging tailored for consumer acceptance.
Italian processing tomato industries usually harvest, pick and process best quality processing tomato, in an integrated “from farm to fork” concept, counting on all the food chain players in distinguished and controlled protocols. Despite the existing economic crisis, investment in research, innovation and pre-competitive studies will be essential to maintain the current world leadership of the Italian tomato quality processed products and to guarantee strategic new tailored made products rich in healthy nutrients for the modern society.

Reference : Tomato Day 2009 presentation
Keyword(s): quality health environment sustainability
Language : English
Country : Italy
Full text : Go to
Email : luca.sandei@ssica.it
Date : 2010-02-22



Auteur(s) : Lycocard consortium
Title : LYCOCARD 2009 annual report
Abstract : LYCOCARD 2009 annual report
Reference : LYCOCARD
Keyword(s): lycopene, health
Language : English
Country : EU
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2010-02-17



Auteur(s) : LYCOCARD CONSORTIUM
Title : Abstracts from Tomato, Lycopene and Health Workshop
Abstract : Abstracts from the "Tomato, Lycopene and Health Conference" organised on 22 October 2009 at INRA (Avignon, France). A unique event dedicated to tomato and lycopene where were presented the state of the art of knowledge and the most recent research results of the nutritional quality of tomato with a focus on its main carotenoid pigment, i.e. lycopene. International senior scientists and young researchers of the LYCOCARD european consortium presented the most up-to-date research on lycopene on the following topics: biosynthesis, physico-chemical properties, metabolisation, biological activities in vitro and in vivo and in particular mechanisms of protection against cancers and cardio-vascular diseases.

Reference : Conference abstracts
Keyword(s): lycopene health
Language : English
Country : EU
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2010-02-17



Auteur(s) : Scott Stoddard
Title : UCCE Statewide Processing Tomato Variety Evaluation Trials, 2009
Abstract : UCCE farm advisors conducted seven mid-maturity tests in 2009, however only 5 locations were harvested. This year, there were no early maturity varieties submitted, a decision that was made by the processors because of a lack of suitable new entries. Seed companies submitted 16 replicated and 14
observation entries for the mid maturity trial. Spring weather was warm and dry across most locations, and all the trials with the exception of the late-planted Fresno location (Fresno #2) had no significant stand establishment problems because of weather or pests. Insect pest pressure was generally low this season, but some of the locations were impacted by high powdery mildew pressure again in 2009, similar to what occurred last year. The Stanislaus County and Merced County trials were accidentally harvested early and no yield data were measured, though fruit were sampled at Stanislaus for PTAB analysis. This year, all locations utilized transplants and drip irrigation.
The mid maturity observational trial yielded well in all locations except Fresno #2, where stand establishment difficulties, virus diseases, and powdery mildew reduced yields to 15 to 40 tons per acre. When test locations were combined, significant differences in yield were found between varieties, with
N6385 (Nunhems), H 5508, H 5608, UG 19406 (United Genetics), and BQ 205 (Woodbridge Seeds) having statistically better overall yields as compared to the other entries. No differences were found between °Brix and color between varieties, which averaged 5.2% and 24.1, respectively. Fruit pH, which in general appears to be increasing over time across all varieties, ranged from 4.35 for UG 19406 to 4.56 for BOS 8800 and BQ 172. In the replicated mid-maturity trial, best yields occurred with H 8504, CXD 255 (Campbells), HM 7883 (Harris Moran), PX 650 (Seminis) and PX 002 (Seminis); HM 7883 also had greater Brix than many other varieties, at 5.3. Significant differences were also seen for color and pH.
Similar to the early maturity trial, pH was elevated, averaging 4.46.

Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): crop, trial, variety
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : csstoddard@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2010-02-17



Auteur(s) : Scott Stoddard
Title : UCCE Statewide Processing Tomato Variety Evaluation Trials, 2008
Abstract : UCCE farm advisors conducted three early-maturity variety tests and seven mid-maturity tests in 2008. This year, Contra Costa County did not conduct a trial, and this was replaced with one in Colusa County. Spring weather was warm and dry across all locations, and most trials had good stand establishment. The
one exception was the mid-maturity trial in San Joaquin County, where high winds shortly after transplanting resulted in a poor stand that could not be harvested, though fruit sampling for PTAB data was performed. Insect pest pressure was generally low this season, but some of the mid-maturity locations were impacted by high powdery mildew pressure again in 2008, similar to what occurred last year. The Stanislaus County Trial was accidentally harvested early and no yield data were measured.
The trials continue to increase in transplants relative to direct seed (only 2 of the 10 locations were direct seeded) and drip irrigation (4 of the 10 were drip irrigated), which mirrors changes taking place in the
industry. The early maturity trials escaped most insect or disease problems and yielded very well in all three locations, averaging almost 46 tons/acre. In the early trial, Sun 6366, BOS66509, and HED 1058 had significantly better yields than the other entries in this test; SUN 6366 and AB 4606 had the highest °Brix. The results for Sun 6366 were similar in 2007, showing this variety to have good yield and soluble solids potential across a wide range of weather and field conditions. Significant differences were observed for
fruit pH between the varieties, though values were high for all, averaging 4.42. Excellent yields were recorded in the mid-season observation trial, averaging nearly 50 tons per acre. However, there were no significant differences in yield between the varieties when test locations were combined. NUN 6385 had
the highest yield at 55.2 tons/A, but also the lowest Brix at only 4.4. In the replicated mid-maturity trial, best yields occurred with SUN 6368, H9780, AB8058, and H2005, and H2005 also had significantly higher Brix than the other varieties at 5.4. H2005 has performed well in these trials in both 2007 and 2008. ignificant differences were also seen for color and pH. Similar to the early maturity trial, pH was elevated, averaging 4.50.
Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): crop, trial, variety
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : csstoddard@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2009-02-11



Auteur(s) : LYCOCARD consortium
Title : LYCOCARD Annual Report 2007
Abstract : First results and workprogramme
Reference : research report
Keyword(s): lycopene, health
Language : EN
Country : European Union
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Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2007-12-06



Auteur(s) : Marianna Faraldi
Title : Presentation on Bioactive-Net
Abstract : Assessment and dissemination of strategies for the extraction of Bioactive compounds from tomato, olive and grape processing residues
Reference : Presentation - Tomato Day Parma 17 October 2007
Keyword(s): waste, lycopene, extraction
Language : English
Country : Italy
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Email : m.faraldi@tecnoalimenti.com
Date : 2007-12-06



Auteur(s) : Luca Sandei
Title : Extraction of lycopene from tomato processing waste
Abstract : Recycling by-products is of interest from the environmental viewpoint (reduction of potential contaminant charge) and for the health benefits derived from their bio-active compounds. These products may be used as such or may be starting materials for the preparation of innovative compounds
Reference : Presentation - Tomato Day Parma 17 October 2007
Keyword(s): lycopene, waste, extraction
Language : English
Country : Italy
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Email : luca.sandei@ssica.it
Date : 2007-12-06



Auteur(s) : Maria Periago
Title : Food products studies within the LYCOCARD project
Abstract : Presnetation of the food products studies within the LYCOCARD project and first results
Reference : Presentation - Tomato Day Parma 17 October 2007
Keyword(s): lycopene, health, processing, varieties
Language : English
Country : European Union
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Email : mjperi@um.es
Date : 2007-12-06



Auteur(s) : Catherine Caris-Veyrat
Title : Influence of crop conditions, harvest stage and post-harvest conditions on the nutritional quality of tomatoes
Abstract : The impact of the project is to study the impact of growing conditions, harvest stage and post-harvest storage conditions on the nutritional quality of tomato fruits. The results will enable to better understand factors influencing fruit nutritional quality.
Reference : Summary of preliminary results
Keyword(s): quality, nutrition, crop conditions
Language : French
Country : France
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Email : caris@avignon.inra.fr
Date : 2007-05-29



Auteur(s) : Scott Stoddard
Title : UCCE Statewide Processing Tomato Evaluation Trials 2006
Abstract : UCCE farm advisors conducted three early-maturity variety tests and seven mid-maturity tests in 2006. Weather played a dominant role in the results of these trials this year. An extended cool and wet spring resulted in delayed planting in many locations, which was exasperated by a very hot summer. The mid season trials were particularly impacted by severe heat in July when daytime temps exceeded 100 °F throughout the Central Valley for a period of about two weeks. This severe heat resulted in poor pollination and fruit set, and a corresponding drop in yield. Most varieties in the mid season trial yielded less than 40 tons/acre in all locations, with the exception of Merced County which was drip irrigated. The early trials escaped most of the extreme heat and yielded very well in Yolo and Contra Costa Counties, averaging 48 and 55 tons/acre respectively. In the early trial, H5003, Sun 6366, BOS 66509, 66508, and APT 410 had significantly better yields than the other entries in this test; HyPeel 45 had the highest °Brix
and lowest pH. Averaged across location, no significant differences were found in the mid-eason
observation trial for yield or Brix; in the replicated trial best yields occurred with DRI 8058 and Sun 6368, while Sun 6374 had significantly higher Brix than the other varieties.

Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): variety, seeds, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : csstoddard@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2007-02-26



Auteur(s) : Michael Titley et al.
Title : Australia tomato evalutation trials 2006
Abstract : Machine harvest trials were established at eleven sites in the major production regions in southern NSW and central north Victoria to evaluate a range of commercial cultivars. Sites were selected to represent early and mid-season production areas as well as different methods of establishment and irrigation.
Reference : Australian Processing Tomato Growers - September 2006
Keyword(s): variety, seeds, quality
Language : English
Country : Australia
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Email : lizmann@aptrc.asn.au
Date : 2007-02-21



Auteur(s) : Steven Loewen
Title : Ontario tomato evaluation trials 2006
Abstract : The report represents a summary of the results from the 2006 processing tomato cultivar evaluation trials. One of the main goals of this project has been to evaluate performance of cultivars over a range of soil types and microclimates. The results have been summarized to show average performance over all sites, as well as performance at each site separately. The reader will find results from both the field performance (ie. yield trials), fruit characteristics (including size, uniformity, firmness and others), processing performance (ie. peeling trials) and juice quality characteristics in order to provide a more complete picture of a cultivar's suitability for the industry.

Reference : University of Guelph (www.ridgetownc.uoguelph.ca)
Keyword(s): variety, seeds, quality
Language : English
Country : Canada
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Email : sloewen@ridgetownc.uoguelph.ca
Date : 2007-02-21



Auteur(s) : Mario Dadomo et al.
Title : Italy (Emilia-Romagna) variety trials 2005
Abstract : First level variety assessment trials were carried out with 45 early varieties and 35 late varieties in 3 locations. Second level variety assessment trials were carried out with 14 early varieties and 11 late varieties in 3 locations.
Reference : Azienda Agraria Sperimentale Stuard (www.stuard.it)
Keyword(s): variety, seeds, quality
Language : Italian
Country : Italy
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Email : dadomo@stuard.it
Date : 2007-02-21



Auteur(s) : Mario Dadomo et al.
Title : Italy (Emilia-Romagna) variety trials 2006
Abstract : · First level variety assessment trials were carried out with 38 early varieties and 27 late varieties in 3 locations. Second level variety assessment trials were carried out with 13 early varieties and 10 late varieties in 3 locations.
Reference : Azienda Agraria Sperimentale Stuard (www.stuard.it)
Keyword(s): variety, seeds, quality
Language : Italian
Country : Italy
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Email : dadomo@stuard.it
Date : 2007-02-21



Auteur(s) : Montana Camara
Title : Tomato products for health: the new trends
Abstract : Tomato products for health: the new trends
Reference : Presentation to WPTC board - October 2006
Keyword(s): lycopene, health, quality, regulations
Language : English
Country : Spain
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Email : mcamara@farm.ucm.es
Date : 2007-02-12



Auteur(s) : Tim Hartz
Title : Soil fertility effect on processing tomato yield and fruit quality
Abstract : Soil fertility effect on processing tomato yield and fruit quality
Reference : Presentation to WPTC board - January 2007
Keyword(s): soil, yield, quality, fertilisation
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : tkhartz@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2007-02-12



Auteur(s) : Jan Mickler et al.
Title : UCCE Statewide Processing Tomato Variety Evaluation Trials, 2005
Abstract : UCCE farm advisors conducted three early-maturity variety tests and seven mid-maturity tests in 2006. Weather played a dominant role in the results of these trials this year. An extended cool and wet spring resulted in delayed planting in many locations, which was exasperated by a very hot summer. The mid season trials were particularly impacted by severe heat in July when daytime temps exceeded 100 °F throughout the Central Valley for a period of about two weeks. This severe heat resulted in poor pollination and fruit set, and a corresponding drop in yield. Most varieties in the mid season trial yielded less than 40 tons/acre in all locations, with the exception of Merced County which was drip irrigated. The early trials escaped most of the extreme heat and yielded very well in Yolo and Contra Costa Counties, averaging 48 and 55 tons/acre respectively. In the early trial, H5003, Sun 6366, BOS 66509, 66508, and APT 410 had significantly better yields than the other entries in this test; HyPeel 45 had the highest °Brix
and lowest pH. Averaged across location, no significant differences were found in the mid-eason
observation trial for yield or Brix; in the replicated trial best yields occurred with DRI 8058 and Sun 6368, while Sun 6374 had significantly higher Brix than the other varieties.

Reference : UCCE
Keyword(s): variety, seeds, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : csstoddard@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Gordon Anthon et al.
Title : Thermal Inactivation of Pectin Methylesterase, Polygalacturonase, and Peroxidase in Tomato Juice
Abstract : Thermal inactivation kinetics have been determined for pectin methylesterase (PME), polygalacturonase (PG), and peroxidase (POD) in tomato juice. Two parameters, the inactivation rate constant ( k) at a reference temperature and the activation energy for inactivation ( Ea), were determined for each enzyme. For PME and PG, the kand Ea values reported here do not agree with those in several previously published reports. These differences can be explained either by the differences in pH values used for inactivation determinations or by inadequacies in the heating methods used in some previous studies. POD showed simple first-order inactivation kinetics and was less thermally stable than either PME or PG. When different cultivars of tomatoes were evaluated, there was no difference in the thermal inactivation kinetics of these enzymes
Reference : Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry - 2002
Keyword(s): enzymes, varieties, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Gordon Anthon & Diane Barrett
Title : Characterization of the Temperature Activation of Pectin Methylesterase in Green Beans and Tomatoes
Abstract : Low-temperature blanching of vegetables activates the enzyme pectin methylesterase (PME), which demethylates cell wall pectins and improves tissue firmness. This temperature activation of PME has been investigated by measuring the formation of methanol in intact tissue of green beans and tomatoes. Rates of methanol formation at temperatures of 35-65 °C were obtained by measuring the release of methanol from thin slices of tomato pericarp or green bean pod material. Activation energies of 112 and 97 kJ mol-1 were calculated for PME activity in green beans and tomatoes, respectively. These activation energies indicate that the rate of pectin demethylation at 65 °C will be nearly 100 times that at 25 °C. PME activity was also determined titrimetrically using a solubilized form of the enzyme and purified pectin at temperatures from 30 to 60 °C. Under these conditions, much lower activation energies of 37 and 35 kJ mol-1 were obtained for green beans and tomatoes, respectively. Methanol accumulation during heating of whole intact green beans was also determined and yielded an activation energy similar to that obtained with sliced beans. Whole green beans held at room temperature did not accumulate any methanol, but sliced or homogenized beans did. If whole beans were first heated to 45 °C and then cooled, methanol accumulation was observed at room temperature. These results indicate that two factors contribute to the observed high rate of pectin de-esterification during low-temperature blanching: (1) An irreversible change, causing PME to become active, occurs by heating to g45 °C. (2) The high activation energy for pectin de-esterification means that the rate of de-esterification increases substantially with increasing temperature.
Reference : Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry - 2006
Keyword(s): enzymes, varieties, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Guadalupe Latapi & Diane Barrett
Title : Influence of Pre-drying treatments on Quality and Safety of Sun-dried Tomatoes. Part II
Abstract : Pre-drying treatments have been found to improve the quality of stored sun-dried tomatoes. Based on previous investigation (Part I), 5 specific pretreatments were chosen for effects on nutritional value, sensory quality, and safety before and after 3 mo of storage (25 °C and 30% to 34% relative humidity). These pretreatments included (1) direct gas sulfuring with 2.3 kg (5 lb) SO2; (2) with 3.6 kg (8 lb) SO2; (3) dipping in 10% salt for 5 min; (4) 8% sodium metabisulfite for 5 min; and (5) 8% sodium metabisulfite and 10% salt for 5 min. The use of SO2 improved color, rehydration ratio, and minimized the loss of ascorbic acid and lycopene. Sodium metabisulfite dipped tomatoes had better rehydration ratio and color than gas sulfured sun-dried tomatoes. Untrained consumers ranked gas sulfured tomatoes higher than sun-dried tomatoes produced by dipping in either sodium metabisulfite alone or sodium metabisulfite plus salt.
Reference : Journal of Food Science -2006
Keyword(s): sun-drying, dehydration, storage, nutrients, sensory, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Guadalupe Latapi & Diane Barrett
Title : Influence of Pre-drying Treatments on Quality and Safety of Sun-dried Tomatoes. Part I
Abstract : The effect of various pre-drying treatments on the subsequent quality of sun-dried tomatoes was evaluated by determining moisture, color, rehydration ratio, mold, yeast, sulfur dioxide, and/or salt content. The 4 pre-drying treatments under investigation were (1) steam blanching or (2) boiling brine blanching, followed by gas sulfuring and (3) dipping in either salt (0%, 10%, 15%, 20%) or (4) sodium metabisulfite (0%, 4%, 6%, 8%) for 0, 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 min. Neither blanching pretreatment improved the quality of the dried product. Salt dipping resulted in significant differences in rehydration ratio, yeast, and salt. The most effective salt pre-treatment conditions were a 10% or 15% salt dip for 5 min. Sodium metabisulfite dipping caused significant differences in rehydration ratio, yeast, color, and sulfur dioxide. Dipping tomatoes in 6% or 8% sodium metabisulfite for 5 min before drying established the best color. The 9 pretreatments studied were also evaluated for storage stability at 25 °C and 30% to 34% relative humidity for 3 mo.
Reference : Journal of Food Science -2006
Keyword(s): sun-drying, dehydration, storage, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Elisabeth Garcia & Diane Barrett
Title : Assessing lycopene content in California processing tomatoes
Abstract : Tomatoes constitute the main source of lycopene in the U.S. diet. Growing interest in the potential health-protective role of lycopene is bringing attention to the content of lycopene in tomatoes. A wide range of lycopene content (55–181 mg/kg) was observed in juice prepared from selected cultivars of tomatoes grown in nine California counties. A comparison of cultivars H 8892, H 9665 and Halley 3155 grown in Colusa, Fresno, San Joaquin and Yolo counties during three seasons concludes that mean lycopene concentrations were significantly greater (P _ 0.01) in 2000 (106 mg/kg) than in 1999 (101 mg/kg) and 2001 (88 mg/kg). An evaluation of nine processing tomato cultivars harvested in one season on four separate dates indicated that lycopène concentration of tomatoes decreases with maturation on the plant. Lycopene concentration of tomatoes is dependent on the growing season, location, cultivar and maturity.
Reference : Journal of Food Processing and Preservation - 2006
Keyword(s): lycopene, varieties,seeds
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Gordon Anthon et al.
Title : Improved Firmness in Calcified Diced Tomatoes by Temperature Activation of Pectin Methylesterase
Abstract : The effects of temper temperature and calcium on pectin methylesterase (PME) activity and texture in tomato pericarp material were examined. Heating thin slices of pericarp to temperatures between 50 °C and 75 °C led to the rapid evolution of methanol from the material, indicating an activation of PME. This activity was fur further stimulated when C CaCl aCl 2 (up to 2.0% w/v) was added. When applied to half-inch diced tomato pericarp, the same conditions that led to the activation of PME also improved firmness. Diced tomatoes treated for 5 min with 0.5% CaCl 2 at 70 °C were 2.5 times firmer than diced tomatoes treated with CaCl 2 at room temperature. This improvement in texture by treating with CaCl 2 at elevated temperatures was only apparent when the tomatoes received a subsequent 100 °C treatment. Heating tomatoes to 70 °C either before or after the CaCl 2 treatment also improved firmness through a subsequent high-temperature treatment, but to a lesser extent than heating during the CaCl 2 treatment. These results are consistent with the model that heating to 70 °C greatly increases PME
activity, leading to extensive pectin de-estrification and increased calcium cross-linking of the pectins in the middle lamella. Production of thermally processed diced tomatoes with improved firmness should be possible by increasing the temperature during and after calcium treatment

Reference : Journal of Food Science -2005
Keyword(s): diced, texture, pectin methylesterase, calcium
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Steve Loewen
Title : Canada: Processing Tomato Cultivar Trials Research Report 2005
Abstract : One of the main goals of this project has been to evaluate performance of cultivars over a range of soil types and microclimates. The results have been summarized to show average performance over all sites, as well as performance at each site separately. The reader will find results from both the field performance (ie. yield trials), fruit characteristics (including size, uniformity, firmness and others), processing performance (ie. peeling trials) and juice quality characteristics in order to provide a more complete picture of a cultivar's suitability for the industry.
Reference : Research report
Keyword(s): variety, seeds, quality
Language : English
Country : Canada
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Email : sloewen@ridgetownc.uoguelph.ca
Date : 2006-03-03



Auteur(s) : Diane Barrett & al.
Title : Can we predict peeling performance of processing tomatoes?
Abstract : Tomato processors are increasingly interested in being able to predict whether tomatoes will peel well, and therefore, yield high-value processed tomatoes. We describe two statistical models for peeling applied to multiple years of data. One model is appropriate for perfect or defect-free tomatoes, and the second model is valid for the normal population of tomatoes obtained following mechanical harvesting. The ability to peel perfect tomatoes was significantly affected by exposure of tomatoes to temperatures greater than 100F, by fruit weight and by pericarp wall thickness. The peelability of a normal population of tomatoes was influenced by tomato weight and width as well as degree-days and exposure to temperatures greater than 90F. Thickness
of the pericarp walls and red layer positively affected the peelability of normal tomatoes. The ability to predict tomato peelability using statistical models may improve the quality of processed tomatoes and may result in more efficient commercial peeling operations.

Reference : Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Keyword(s): peeling, varieties
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-02



Auteur(s) : Diane Barrett & al.
Title : Deffect and peelability of processing tomatoes
Abstract : Peeling is one of the first operations in the manufacture of whole peeled an diced tomatoes, and the peelability of processing tomatoes is significantly affected by the presence of various tomato defects, in particular yellow eye and blossom-end rot. Tomato maturity also impacts both the percentage of peeled fruit and yield. Immature fruits are typically undercolored and small in size. Sunburned regions on the tomato surface are difficult to peel as well. In this study, we determined the impact of 24 selected tomato defects on tomato peelability and yield of whole peeled tomatoes. There are potential advantages to sorting to remove selected tomato defects early in the process.
Reference : Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Keyword(s): peeling, varieties
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-02



Auteur(s) : Elisabeth Garcia & Diane Barrett
Title : Peelability and yield of processing tomato by steam and lye
Abstract : Approximately 25% of the processed tomatoes grown in California aremade into value-added foods such as whole peeled and diced tomatoes. Peel removal is the first step in this process, and it must be optimized for both quality and yield. The effect of peeling conditions on tomato cultivars Halley 3155 and Heinz 8892 (H 8892) was evaluated. Considerable texture loss results from peeling; however, firmness was greater for cv. Halley 3155 than for cv. H 8892 regardless of peeling conditions utilized. Peeling under low steam pressures (12 psig) was insufficient to adequately peel either cultivar. While high pressure steam (18 psig) was more efficient at peel removal, increasing vacuum level from 20 in. to 24 in. did not improve peelability of
either cultivar. Because cultivar affected peelability and yield, specific tomato cultivars should be evaluated and directed to either paste or whole peeled and diced tomatoes as appropriate.
Reference : Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Keyword(s): peeling, varieties, texture
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-02



Auteur(s) : Elisabeth Garcia & Diane Barrett
Title : Evaluation of processing tomatoes from two consecutive growing seasons: quality attributes, peelability, yield
Abstract : Peelability is an important quality parameter in the selection of tomato cultivars (cvs.) for whole peeled and dice processing. Six processing tomato cvs. were evaluated in two consecutive years to examine the effects of cv., maturity and physical attributes on peelability and yield. Physical attributes of the raw tomatoes (size, weight, pericarp wall thickness, color) and processed paste quality (pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, Bostwick consistency, serum viscosity, color) were determined. Large variations in physical attributes and paste quality were observed in selected tomato cvs. and maturities. In general, most of the attributes indicative of paste quality were more desirable at the less mature (e.g., pink) stage and declined with maturity. Statistical analysis suggests that there were significant differences in percentage of peeled tomatoes, peel index, and yields of whole peeled and diced tomatoes between two consecutive growing years.
Reference : Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Keyword(s): peeling, varieties, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-02



Auteur(s) : Gordon Anthon & Diane Barrett
Title : Thermal inactivation of lipoxygenase and hydroperoxytrienoic acid lyase in tomatoes
Abstract : Lipoxygenase (LOX) and hydroperoxytrienoic acid lyase (HPL) activities were determined in tomato juice from four cultivars of processing tomatoes. Large differences in total activity levels were found between different cultivars. Thermal inactivation kinetics of these two enzymes were determined for two cultivars used in cold break processing. LOX inactivation did not follow simple first order kinetics. The data could be fitted by assuming that three isoforms of LOX are present. HPL inactivation also indicated the presence of labile and resistant forms with the resistant form showing simple first order inactivation kinetics. The inactivation kinetics for both enzymes indicate that they would be rapidly inactivated at the cold break target temperature of 60 _C. It is questionable whether the activity of these two enzymes contributes to the superior flavour associated with products produced by the cold break process.
Reference : Food Chemistry
Keyword(s): enzymes, thermoinactivation
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-03-02



Auteur(s) : Diane Barrett
Title : Discovering Marketable Quality Improvements in Processing Tomatoes: Color, Firmness and Phytonutrient Value
Abstract : Presentation
Reference : Presentation to WPTC board - January 2006
Keyword(s): color, firmness, nutrition, quality
Language : English
Country : California
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Email : dmbarrett@ucdavis.edu
Date : 2006-02-10



Auteur(s) : Adriano Battilani
Title : Processing Tomato cropping system sustainability pathways
Abstract : Moving from traditional cropping systems to sustainable ones require big efforts and, in practice, not all farming are able or willing to take such a leap. However, as stated by MacRae (1993) “ Everyone can take small steps, and small steps added together can bring about big change in the end”
Reference : Presentation to WPTC board - October 2005
Keyword(s): sustainability, crop
Language : English
Country : Italy
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Email : battilani@consorziocer.it
Date : 2005-11-23



Auteur(s) : Adriano Battilani
Title : Safe and High Quality Food Production using Low Quality Waters and Improved Irrigation Systems and Management
Abstract : The project addresses two fundamental problems that over the past decade increasingly have become concerns of the general public: the one problem being the jeopardizing of safety and quality of our food products, while the other being the increasing competition for clean fresh water. The project has a multi-disciplinary approach, which integrate the European as well as the global dimension of the EU-policy on food quality and safety. The main driving force behind the project idea is new research results, which demonstrate that irrigation pattern can increase the water use efficiency as well as the quality of vegetable crops. Furthermore, recent innovations in the water treatment and irrigation industry have shown potential for the use of low quality water resources, such as rivers and other surface water, for irrigation of vegetable crops without jeopardizing food safety or quality.
Reference : Presentation of research project
Keyword(s): water, irrigation
Language : English
Country : European Union
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Email : battilani@consorziocer.it
Date : 2005-11-23



Auteur(s) : Philippe Bussières
Title : IRRIGERE
Abstract : IRRIGERE is a software designed to asist in the irrigation of tomatoes for processing.The software can be obtained free of charge on request to the email address: philippe.bussieres@avignon.inra.fr
Reference : Software
Keyword(s): irrigation, fertilisation, crop
Language : English - French -Spanish - Italian
Country : France/Italy
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Email : philippe.bussieres@avignon.inra.fr
Date : 2005-08-29



Auteur(s) : AMITOM
Title : LYCOCARD
Abstract : LYCOCARD is a EU research project which will be investigating the protective effects of lycopene against cardiovascular diseases in humans. The 5 year project will start in January 2006.
Reference : EU research proposal
Keyword(s): lycopene, health, cardiovascular diseases
Language : English
Country : European Union
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Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2005-08-29



Auteur(s) : Steve Loewen
Title : Processing Tomato Cultivar Trials Research Report 2004
Abstract : Summary of the results of the 2004 processing tomato cultivar evaluation trials.
Reference : University of Guelph Research Report
Keyword(s): variety trials, seeds
Language : English
Country : Canada
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Email : sloewen@ridgetownc.uoguelph.ca
Date : 2005-06-24



Auteur(s) : AMITOM
Title : Increase the antioxidant content in tomato products with incorporation of skin and seeds
Abstract : the enrichment of tomato purees in lycopene through the addition of 6% of finely milled peel was validated in a in vitro model of the bioaccessibility and in a human study. The ratios observed for lycopene between the enriched puree and the standard puree were 1.6 in the food preparations, 1.3 in a acellular models ( micelles) and 1.56 in humans. These results showed that the lycopene is well absorbed from the finely milled peel and that the 60% increase of the lycopene content of these purees results is human by a nearly equivalent increase in lycopene post-pandrial response.
Reference : AQS report 00 P 04
Keyword(s): lycopene, skin, seeds, puree, health
Language : French (English summary)
Country : France
Full text : Go to
Email : colvine@tomate.org
Date : 2005-06-24



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